Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ Specs

 

Head Size:    98 in² / 632 cm²

Length:    27,5in / 69,9cm

Strung Weight:    323g / 11,4oz

Unstrung Weight:    305g/10,8oz

Balance:    33,02cm / 6 pts HL

Swingweight:    340

String Pattern:    16 Mains / 19 Crosses

 

Our Review

 

The Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ might weight just 305g unstrung, but there is no doubting that this racket is an absolute beast. This extended length stick has a huge swingweight of 340 and promises a big combination of power and feel.

Tennis Bro Tom, is our resident extended length racket man, having used the Babolat Pure Drive Tour Plus in the past. Although both these rackets are extended length behemoths, they’re actually set up quite differently. The Pure Drive Tour Plus is heavier at 315g unstrung but has a much lower swingweight of 328.

This should make quite a difference in how the two rackets play and I was actually quite looking forward to this playtest. I always look for rackets with a slightly lower actual weight and bigger swingweight, so the Srixon CX 200+ is perfect in that sense. The big question was how manoeuvrable it would be. It only weighs 305g, but it still has the potential to be quite cumbersome.

On paper, this racket looks like the perfect stick for players who want the feel of a heavy racket with the manoeuvrability of a light racket. We really enjoyed the regular Dunlop Srixon CX 200, but we did mention that we wanted a little bit more swingweight. Well, Dunlop has more than answered our prayers with the CX 200+ and the added swingweight has really brought this racket into my spec zone (I may have invented my own saying there).

Technology wise, the Srixon CX 200+ has all the same gadgets that we enjoyed in the regular CX 200, with Sonic-Core, Infinergy, and PowerGridStringTech all included. All of these work together to help make this racket a little bit more arm-friendly, absorbing shocks and generally making tennis a little bit more comfortable.

These technologies might have to work overtime in the Srixon CX 200+ as an oversized 305g racket with a 340 swingweight has the potential to be a little bit difficult to play with, so I was interested to see how the CX 200+ would perform.

Personally, over-sized rackets are not something I’ve ever got into, I’ve always got along best with a regular sized racket and not really needed anything else, but there are plenty of benefits to be had from these rackets. If you’ve got some fairly advanced swings and want to add a little something extra to your game, these rackets can be a great option.

For this playtest, I wanted to make the most of the Srixon CX 200+’s feel but also keep a good level of control so I went with a string setup of Solinco Hyper-G at 52 lbs.

When you’ve got a playtest lined up with a racket you know has the potential to give you some serious power it’s tempting to go for a power setup and break out the speed gun, but this time my sensible head prevailed and I went for a pretty balanced setup.

 

Groundstrokes – 8.5/10

 

It’s important to make the distinction here between easy power and natural power. The Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ is not a racket that gives you easy power. If you can’t get this racket moving quickly through the swing and plowing through the ball, then you aren’t going to get much out of this stick. However, if you have good mechanics, fast swings, and natural power then this racket is going to turn those strokes into bombs.

There’s a bit of a danger that someone might see this racket in a shop and think 305g, I’ll give that a try. But, if they don’t have the right level of strokes, they’re probably going to try it and think this racket is terrible. However, for a more advanced player with good strokes, this racket has the potential to be an absolute weapon.

On the forehand side, I found this racket to be a dream. It’s not quite as manoeuvrable as my regular racket but it had a little bit more stability to make up for that and the result was some serious power from a racket that offered great feel. When I was on the front foot, I was able to attack the ball into the corners and swing through the ball with a huge amount of confidence.

I tend not to attack so much off the backhand side, but I found the great plow through of this racket helped me get my wrists through the ball with plenty of speed helping me keep a really good length. When I mixed in the slice, I found I was able to keep it wickedly low and get it moving off the court, putting my opponent under some serious pressure.

The CX 200+ was a little bit more difficult to play with when I was on the backfoot, but for someone like myself who tries to avoid that scenario, I didn’t find that to be too much of an issue. The main issue is making sure you keep up good racket head speed when you’re on defense, because if you can do this, the plow through will help you keep the ball deep and get back on the front foot.

Having said that, I think if I was a counterpuncher, I would struggle with this racket. You’ve just got to do a little bit too much work to make this racket efficient to play a more defensive game style with. It’s much better suited to someone who likes to keep the points short and sweet by taking the initiative early on in the point.

As far as extended rackets go, the Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ is easily one of the best I have played with. It’s still got reasonable levels of manoeuvrability and blends natural power with lovely feel – exactly what I look for. I gave it an 8.5 out of 10 for the groundstrokes, having been extremely impressed by its performance.

Volleys – 8.5/10

 

The CX 200+ has the kind of stability you rarely see from a 305g racket, which makes it a great prospect at the net. It’s not as easy to manoeuvre as the majority of lighter rackets, but I didn’t find that to be too much of an issue.

Once again, I would suggest this racket is better suited to players with fairly developed strokes. For beginner and intermediate players, you want a racket that is really easy to get into position at the net and the Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ is not really that. Experienced players shouldn’t have any problems getting this stick moving though, and when they do, they will find they get very good performance from the CX 200+.

When I had to play difficult pickup volleys the CX 200+ gave me the stability I needed to block the ball back with plenty of control, but the main benefit I found was when I needed to inject pace into the ball. I absolutely destroyed a couple of overheads with this racket, which got me very excited to move onto serves!

I’m not sure if purist, serve-volleyers still exist in singles (I hope they do!), but, given the feel and volleying performance of this racket, it is one of the few rackets under 310g that I could see a serve-volleyer using. It has good control and feel and doesn’t let you down when you are forced into playing some difficult volleys.

I gave the Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ an 8.5 out of 10 for volleys and found it was a racket that a serve-volleyer would enjoy. Certainly, it would make an excellent weapon for doubles, where the stability works as well on returns as it does at net.

 

Serve – 8.5/10

 

The serve is always an area where the extended length rackets give you a bit of a boost. The higher you hit the ball from the easier it is to get the ball over the net, so that extra bit of length can be quite valuable. If you’re someone who’s got a strong service action, then the Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ is a good option for extracting the most out of this shot.

It might not be the most manoeuvrable 305g racket, but at the end of the day, the CX 200+ is still a relatively light racket, so you shouldn’t struggle to produce plenty of racket head speed on the serve. I find this is vitally important on the serve, as with some of the heavier rackets I can get a bit bogged down through the swing. With the CX 200+ I didn’t have that problem, but I still got a lot of the performance of a heavier racket.

I was really cranking up the mph during the playtest, but I never felt I was lacking control. My first serve percentage remained pretty good and I was able to go after my targets with confidence. When I did want to change things up and mix in the odd slice out wide that worked nicely, and I was able to get the ball moving off the court and away from my opponent.

On the second serve, I felt the stability of the racket gave me great confidence to hit through the ball, getting plenty of topspin to make sure my serve wasn’t easy to attack. I made the odd double fault but when don’t I! The important thing was that I felt very confident with the Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ when I stepped up to the line.

The Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ put in another good performance on the serve and earned an 8.5 out of 10. If you’ve got solid swings and can get this racket moving, you’re going to see some good results.

 

Overall – 8.5/10

 

Overall, this is easily one of the best extended length rackets I have played with. It’s not a racket that will magically give you easy power from nowhere, but if you’ve got good strokes then it will help you maximize what you do have. The CX 200+ does this whilst offering great feel and more comfort than its hefty 340 swingweight might suggest.

There were no areas where I didn’t enjoy playing with the CX 200+ as I found it gave a balanced performance throughout. I certainly think this racket is best suited to an advanced player who spends most of their time playing on the front foot. When you’re in control of the point and looking to attack the ball this racket is ideal, whether you’re doing it from the back of the court or from the net

If this racket does have a weakness it is on defense, where it can be a little bit difficult to handle. When your racket head speed drops a little you do find you’re left dropping the ball short, and I think that might get a bit tiresome for someone who spends a lot of time on the backfoot. For myself, I try to spend as little time as possible on defense, so it really didn’t bother me too much!

I gave the Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ an 8.5 out of 10, overall. I’ve never gelled with an extended length racket before, but I felt perfectly at home with the CX 200+. If you’re an advanced player who loves to attack and is looking to try something a bit different, I would certainly recommend giving the Dunlop Srixon CX 200+ a try.

 

Review by: Will