Prince Textreme Beast 100 Specs

 

Head Size:100 sq. in. / 645.16 sq. cm.

Length:27in / 68.58cm

Strung Weight:11.2oz / 317.51g

Unstrung Weight: 10.6oz / 300g

Balance:12.79in / 32.49cm / 6 pts HL

Swingweight:322

String Pattern:16 Mains / 19 Crosses

Just another Prince racket with a great name – we got our hands on the Prince Textreme Beast 100 and took it out for a thorough playtest.

The Beast is known for it’s fast, power-friendly nature and it’s just one of those rackets that’s easy to play with. This is ideal for beginners, intermediates, and advanced players who seek plenty of power from their racket, but for those players who thrive on control, you might find this stick is a little too powerful.

The Beast series was an update on the Warrior rackets, offering plenty of power, good access to spin, and easy playability. We’ve found with our other playtests on Beast rackets that they generally get things right offering players the power and spin to maximize their games.

With the Prince Textreme Beast 100, you’ve very much got a racket that falls in the middle for most characteristics, with a 300g unstrung weight, 100sq inch head size, and 16 x 19 string pattern that will appeal to a wide variety of players.

In terms of its characteristics, the Beast 100 reminded us a lot of the Babolat Pure Aero as it’s one of those rackets that can help you generate some serious power and spin. You always picture these rackets in the hands of aggressive players who love to get the ball moving quickly through the air.

I normally go for a much more control-oriented racket, but I do enjoy ripping through the ball and getting some serious RPMs on the ball, so I had plenty of fun during my week playing with the Prince Textreme Beast 100.

We strung this tennis racket with Solinco Tour Bite Soft at 50lbs to try and add a little bit more control whilst encouraging its huge spin potential. This set up worked pretty well for us, but if you’re trying to pick out the perfect string setup for yourself then take a look at Tom’s Tennis String Tension Guide.

Anyway, we’d booked out some indoor courts for the week so we didn’t have to brave the ever more wintery conditions as we put the Beast 100 through its paces.

 

Groundstrokes – 7.5/10

 

I got the feeling that this was what the Beast 100 was made for, powerful hitting from the back of the court. This racket swings so effortlessly and turns your racket head speed into easy power and spin, which makes playing almost feel effortless.

If you’re naturally a big hitter then you may find you have to tame things down a little bit and add extra spin to drag the ball back down into the court, which isn’t ideal. So, for players with really fast, long swings, this might not be the best racket, but for players with less aggressive strokes, this stick works very well.

I found the Textreme Beast made a nice change for me because I had that easy power available to me and I didn’t have to constantly throw everything at the ball. I could take it a little bit easier and still get plenty of power and spin to put my opponent under pressure. The downside was, I did feel like I was sacrificing control for this luxury. I had to make sure I kept putting a ton of topspin on the ball to keep it from sailing deep past the baseline.

There’s always a trade-off that you’ve got to make, so it depends whether you prefer power or control and where the balance is for you. On a personal level, I go much more towards control than this racket does, but there will be plenty of players who can benefit from this stick’s qualities.

Taking out my personal preference for more control, this racket does everything it should do. It’s designed to be a racket that offers easy playability with plenty of power and spin and that’s what it does. We gave the Prince Textreme Beast 100 a 7.5 out of 10 for groundstrokes.

Volleys – 7/10

 

All that power and not so much control mean the Prince Textreme Beast 100 isn’t perfectly set up for life at the net, but it doesn’t do a bad job.

On the plus side, this racket is extremely easy to get into position and it’s generally very comfortable to play with. The downsides were that I just felt the ball pinged on me, and when the ball was hit very hard at me, it was difficult to control it.

If you’re playing at a high level then this might be a concern, but at beginner and intermediate levels, it’s not likely to cause many issues.

For the most part, I think this racket is going to be best suited to someone who spends most of their time at the back of the court, coming to the net to finish off the point behind a strong approach shot. That’s how I like to play, and for singles, it worked well, I was able to put away the easy balls and win plenty of points.

However, the Beast 100 didn’t quite have the control and feel at the net that I needed for doubles. I’m normally pretty confident at the net, but I did have some problems in this area during the playest.

For singles, the Beast does enough for all levels of players as long as they play predominantly from the baseline. For doubles, I don’t think this racket is strong enough at the net for higher-level players, it’s just a bit short on control.

We gave the Prince Textreme Beast 100 a 7 out of 10 for volleys.

 

Serve – 8/10

 

A mix of maneuverability and easy power makes for a lot of fun when it comes to serving. Without having to put too much effort in I was able to generate some good speeds and pick up a lot of free points.

I do love a racket like the Best that offers easy maneuverability on the serve and that’s what I got from this stick. Once you get it moving in the right direction is just feels like it wants to keep going, so I just let it fly and aimed to do some damage with big first serves.

The serve was actually an area where I found the power to be quite controllable. Whereas on the groundstrokes I sometimes found the ball sailing on me, with the serve I was getting the right flight path to allow the ball to drop into the service box. On the second serve as well, I was able to use the racket head speed to create good spin and give myself a little bit more margin for error.

All in all, everything went pretty well on the serve and I felt like I was winning a high percentage of points behind my serve. Holding serve is one of the key steps to winning a tennis match, so you can’t complain about that. The Prince Textreme Beast gets an 8 out of 10 on the serve.

 

Return – 7/10

 

I might have been holding serve well but I found life a little bit more difficult when it came to breaking serve. This is where you really need a little bit of control to tame the big serve coming down at you, and the Beast didn’t offer what I’m used to.

There are certainly far worse rackets out there to return with, but I just felt it could drop a bit of its power in favor of a bit more control. However, I’m sure there are plenty of players out there who want and need that power, so they’re willing to make the sacrifice.

If you get the timing a little bit off with the return then you might well see the ball ping on your with the Beast 100, but as long as you get your timing right and balance the power out with plenty of spin you can get the ball dropping back into court. It’s just a little more challenging.

This wasn’t the strongest part of the playtest and we gave the Prince Textreme Beast 100 a 7 out of 10 for the return.

Conclusion – 7.5/10

 

The Beast 100 is a good middle ground racket – with a great name. If you want a little extra power from your racket and plenty of access to spin then this stick is well worth taking a look at.

This racket feels most comfortable from the back of the court, where you’re sure to find plenty of power and spin available to you. As always, you’ve got that trade off between power and control and whether you get on with this racket will really depend on where you fall on this divide. For me, I felt like I had to focus too much on putting lots of spin on the ball to keep the control, but others will enjoy that extra pop you get.

My groundstroke game was nicely backed up by a very good serving performance where I was able to ramp up the MPH and win a lot of points of the serve. Following the ball into the net wasn’t always the best option with this stick though, and I would certainly classify it as one for the aggressive baseliner who comes to the net to put away the easy volley.

The nice thing about this playtest was it was just easy. Playing with this racket is pretty effortless and it’s very comfortable, so I can’t fault it in that area.

At the end of the day, lots of people are going to like this racket and we gave it a good solid score of 7.5 out of 10.

 

Review by: Will