The lightest of the Warrior rackets, the Prince Textreme Warrior 100L is set up for juniors and beginner to intermediate tennis players to continue developing their game.

With a strung weight of 272g and a very open 16 x 18 string pattern, this racket makes it easy to get the racket swinging quickly and have you hitting with spin and power.

As a beginner player, the main thing you want is something that you feel comfortable swinging with. Tennis strokes aren’t necessarily the most natural movements, so you really don’t want anything that is cumbersome and difficult to move around. The Textreme Warrior 100L has you covered here by offering a lightweight package that does everything you need.

For many adults, my one question might be whether this racket might be a little bit too light. Certainly, for a full-grown male, I think you might be better served looking at something nearer 300g strung as a beginner racket, and females too should also consider this weight at the same time.

The weight of your racket is a personal preference, but it’s well worth testing a few rackets at different weights to get a feel for what suits you best. If you wanted to try something a bit heavier than this racket then take a look at something like the Babolat Pure Aero Team or the Head Graphene 360 Speed S to get a good idea of what you’re suited to.

You might find that as a true beginner the very light Textreme Warrior 100L is the best option, but as you progress, you’re likely to want something heavier, so it’s worth finding out where you stand when it comes to weight.

We took the Textreme Warrior 100L out for a playtest though and were pretty impressed with the simplicity of the racket. It’s easy to swing, but it’s also got enough stability to allow you to hit with a little bit of power and spin, so it allows you to improve your game for the future whilst giving you some performance in the here and now.

For this playtest, we strung the Prince Textreme Warrior 100L with Head RIP Control String at 52lbs which gave us a nice balance between power, spin, and control. Potentially, for a true beginner, you might want a slightly more powerful string than this, but certainly, it would make for a nice option for intermediate players.

If you’re looking for a little bit more information on the stringing side of things then check out Tom’s Tennis String Tension Guide.

The Textreme Warrior 100L is much lighter than the rackets I normally use so I couldn’t expect supreme performance from this stick. What I was looking for was a racket that’s uncomplicated and easy to play with.

Would the Warrior 100L meet my requirements?

Groundstrokes – 6.5/10

 

For such a light racket this isn’t a bad score. When it comes to it, you can’t do the same things on a tennis court with a 270g racket that you can with a 320g racket and I have to take that into account with the scoring, but really, the Textreme Warrior did what I wanted it to. It kept things simple and as long as I kept things simple I didn’t have any problems from the back of the court.

The Textreme Warrior 100L helps you generate good racket head speed because it is light and because it is head heavy it stays quite stable on impact with the ball. This helps turn the racket head speed you generate into power and spin, two things that are always useful on the tennis court!

My big question here, and I don’t really have an answer to it, is this: are you better off as a beginner with a super light racket like this one, where, in the short term you’re going to find it very easy to swing, or are you better off going with something slightly heavier that has better performance potential and growing into that racket?

I’d lean towards the latter, but it is a personal decision. Some people are going to find the Prince Textreme Warrior 100L feels right for them, others are going to find it is just a little bit too light. The best way to figure out this question is by demoing a few different rackets. Don’t just blindly buy, put some time into your decision and you will find it really helps your tennis.

In this playtest, I found the Prince to be much more effective off my backhand side, and that’s probably because it’s a much simpler stroke for me. My forehand has more moving parts to it, so there is more room for things to go wrong. This is expected from a beginner racket and really, it’s what you would want.

You want this racket to reward simple, clean strokes, and encourage you to keep developing your tennis. The Warrior 100L does this, but at some point, perhaps in the not too distant future, you will outgrow it.

On the plus side, the Warrior 100L is maneuverable, makes hitting with power and spin easy, and is relatively comfortable. On the downside, I think if you sacrificed a tiny bit of maneuverability you could get more on the performance side.

Overall though, I would say this was a reasonable performance from the Prince Textreme Warrior 100L. 6.5 out of 10 might seem like a low score, but it’s not bad for a lightweight racket.

 

Volleys – 6/10

 

Volleying really isn’t the forte of the lighter rackets. They’re OK for pinging the ball back accross the net but that’s about it. The good thing is, you don’t need your racket to do much more than that for you when you’re starting out in tennis.

The Textreme Warrior 100L has the one key ingredient that you need as a beginner and that is it’s light and easy to get into position. When you’ve got little time to react to the ball coming to you it can be hard to get a heavy racket into position but there were no such problems with this racket.

Given its light weight, it was surprisingly solid on contact with the ball. Which helps give you a little bit of control, but obviously, a heavier racket is going to do slightly better in this area. Still, the Prince Textreme Warrior 100L’s performance at the net was better than I thought it would be and it really didn’t let itself down.

Once again, the theme here is that the Warrior 100L will do enough for you as a beginner. It’s when you start to improve that you might find it wanting a little.

Nevertheless, it did better than we thought, and we gave it a 6 out of 10 for the volleys, not a bad score for such a light racket.

Serve – 6.5/10

 

The Prince Textreme Warrior 100L did what you need a beginner racket to do on serve. Being so light, it was easy to get the racket swinging quickly, which will help beginner players generate power. Once you come to contact, it was about as stable as you could expect a 272g racket to be, giving a solid platform to hit the ball from.

There’s not too much more to talk about here. The Textreme Warrior 100L has got the basics covered and it’s unfair to ask much more from it. That’s great when you’re a beginner, but you’re probably not going to be a beginner for too long, so you will grow out of this racket with time.

I thought the Prince Textreme Warrior 100L gave a pretty good account of itself on the serve and gave it a 6.5 out of 10. If the weight suits you and you’re a beginner player, then it’s an ideal match.

 

Overall – 6.5/10

 

I said at the beginning that I was looking for a racket that’s uncomplicated and easy to play with and the Prince Textreme Warrior 100L is that. It’s not going to offer you incredible performance, it just does the simple things well and allows you to develop your game.

An overall score of 6.5 out of 10 isn’t the most eye-catching result, but it’s not a bad score for this type of racket. What limits it is the fact that its usefulness is limited to a small number of people – beginner players who want a very light racket.

If you’re one of those players, then this racket is certainly one to look at, the one thing to remember is that as you improve your game, you might well want a racket that’s more advanced. For learning the game though, the Textreme Warrior 100L isn’t a bad option and you could certainly do much worse.

 

Click Here to get the Prince Textreme Warrior 100L from Amazon Today!

 

Review by: Will