At TheTennisBros.com we like to tailor our advice based on your playing level, to make sure you get the best out of your game.

This is especially true when it comes to tennis rackets. This is your most important tool and should feel like an extension of your arm as you play.

Therefore, we know how important it is to pick the right racket for you, especially as you play at a more advanced level.

That’s why we created our custom fitting service for you, to ensure that you can make the right choice based on your game style, playing level and string preferences.

Now, as an advanced player you will probably have a good idea of the type of racket you are after.

We expect you’re a player with a big game, that likes to strike the ball cleanly and dominate points when you can.

That is, looking for a control oriented racket, that will give you decent pop, whilst maintaining stability and control as you start ramping up your game.

There are a few factors to consider when looking at the best rackets for advanced players.

We understand this can be a difficult and drawn out process, which is why we’ve put together this guide to help you pick the best racket for you.

Here at Thetennisbros.com we have reviewed hundreds of individual rackets, so be sure to check out our more in depth reviews for a more detailed insight.

What you should be looking for in a  racket

 

The best tennis rackets for advanced players should cater for those who can generate their own power and have solid technical foundations.

Therefore, you’re unlikely to need a ton of additional power from your racket.

Although generating easy power is always a plus point for any racket, many modern rackets, especially when equipped with the right string set-up, will give a decent level of power (even those more oriented towards controlling the ball).

Therefore as a player that uses their body to take full swings at the ball, who is looking to control shots on the stretch and needs a racket to feel solid in pressurised situations, you’ll be looking for a that will help you control the ball with pin-point accuracy.

Of course, it is also important for your racket to generate good spin and power, however there are a few important specifications that will determine how much of these are produced.

 

Weight

 

The weight of your racket is one of the most important considerations to make when choosing a new tennis racket.

Whilst a lighter racket will be more maneuverable, a heavier racket will give you more stability, control, power and plow through on your shots.

Of course, the weight of the racket you choose will depend on your strength, fitness levels, playing ability and simply personal preference, however most advanced players will be looking for a racket above 300g.

Most rackets in this sector tend to range from 300g to 330g, with some going up as high as 340g.

It is therefore especially important to trial the racket or rackets you are considering, as using a racket that is too heavy can cause injury.

 

Head Size

 

As an advanced player, you’ll need a racket that will help you control the ball when hitting aggressively with full swings.

A racket with a smaller head size will help with this, as it offers a more direct feel to the ball and helps you place the ball exactly where you want to.

With that being said, almost all of the advanced or performance rackets will be under 100sq in, with the majority balling between 95 and 100sq in.

Some rackets may be even smaller than this, but these tend to be reserved for the more old school player that is used to a very small racket.

The sweet spot in this sector tends to be between 95 and 98sq in. But of course it is worth trying a few different rackets in this range to see which head size fits best for your game.

 

Balance

 

The balance of a racket will determine how it feels to swing. This is an important factor that is often overlooked by players, but is very influential to how the racket feels and it’s playing characteristics.

A head light racket tends to favour a net rusher. This is because with more weight in the grip, the racket will feel lighter to swing and be more maneuverable.

Most smaller head size, heavier rackets from the 1990s would favour a headlight set up, as serve and volleying was so much more prevalent.

Whereas a head heavy racket would tend to favour a big hitting baseline player. This is because the racket will feel more weighty, like a sledgehammer.

This helps add power to your shots as the racket will act as a heavy pendulum at the end of your arm.

Many advanced players will add weight to their rackets to increase stability and stiffness to help improve playability.

Most performance rackets will favour a more balanced set up, with more control oriented rackets tending towards a headlight set up.

Whereas power orientated rackets will tend towards a head heavy weighting.

So, if you are a serve and volley player, or like to get to the net as much as possible then a headlight would best suit your game.

Whereas if you like to dominate from the baseline and club winners, then a head heavy racket is the one for you.

 

String Pattern

 

String patterns will also play into the feel of a racket. A denser string pattern will offer more stability and a solid feel, whilst helping you flatten out the ball.

These string patterns are ‘closed’ and tend to be an 18×20 pattern.

Whereas a more open string pattern, generally around 16×19, will offer increased spin and a more lively feel.

When it comes to string pattern, it is really worth testing a racket out to see which feels best for you.

Feel is a difficult thing to gauge objectively, so understanding which string pattern is right for you is a key part of choosing the perfect racket.

 

Stiffness 

 

The stiffness of a racket also plays into its overall feel and performance. Racket stiffness reflects how much it will flex at contact with the ball.

Racket stiffness is measured between 50 and 70RA, so the lower the rating the more flexible the racket will be.

A stiffer frame will offer you more power, due to more energy being conserved in the racket at the point of contact with the ball.

Stiffer rackets also offer more stability and a consistent contact.

However, you may find that this could cause strain on your arm if you are not used to playing with a stiff racket.

On the other hand, many players prefer a more flexible racket due to the plush feel. They like the softer feel that helps control volleys and touch shots.

Overall a stiffer racket will offer a more crisp, precise feel on the ball, whereas a flexible racket will be easier on the arm and help you caress the ball.

 

Our Best Rackets for Advanced Players

 

We appreciate that there is a vast array of different rackets suitable for the advanced tennis player.

The number of factors when choosing a stick can make this an overwhelming process.

So whilst we aren’t big fans of structured lists here at Thetennisbros.com, especially with such a personal subject as picking the right tennis racket.

However, we have selected some of the best tennis rackets for advanced players below, to give you some inspiration.

Whilst the following rackets vary in weight, head size, string pattern, stiffness and balance, they are all geared towards a performance player that is looking for more control and stability.

With that being said, let’s take a look at some of the best options for advanced players.

 

Wilson Pro Staff 97 Autograph

Who wouldn’t want to play with Roger Federer’s racket!

This is the ultimate players racket which will give you the ultimate control and feel, whilst offering a larger sweet spot than Federer’s old 90sq in Wilson Pro Staff.

The heaviest stock racket on the market, this racket offers great power and control, if you can handle the vast weight!

Wilson Clash 98

The Clash promises a strike force of Wilson’s new technology, along with old school stability.

Whilst combining comfort and power is never an easy feat, Wilson have certainly achieved it here with the Clash 98.

A great racket for aggressive players that generates a lot of spin and power, whilst retaining a good level of control from the 98sq in head.

 

Prince Phantom 100X 18×20

This iteration of the Phantom comes with a thicker beam and a plusher feel to the previous version.

The 18×20 string pattern offers a good amount of control and solid feel, whilst the racket offers a decent amount of pop for a control focussed stick.

The racket offers great playability and comfort

 

Babolat Pure Drive Tour

This beefier power orientated racket delivers a powerful punch.

Though the more headlight setup compared to the 300g version means that you won’t be compromising maneuverability with this racket.

Overall a great all rounder that will help you plough through your groundstrokes and feel in control from the baseline!

This has always been a power oriented racket for pure ball strikers, as the name would suggest!

 

Babolat Pure Aero VS Tour

The heavier big brother of the extremely popular 305g Pure Aero gives a racket more suited to advanced players.

The heavier swing weight combined with a head light balance makes this nice and whippy for such a heavy stick, helping you to rip the ball with insane spin whilst adding more control and stability to your game.

 

Head Graphene 360 Extreme Pro

A well balanced racket with a relatively high swingweight, the Extreme pro favours players looking for more spin on their shots!

Stick of choice for French Legend Richard Gasquet, the racket is renowned for helping you rip the ball with ease thanks to its open 16×19 string pattern and grommet technology.

A great choice for the player searching for some extra whip!

 

Head Graphene Touch Prestige Mid 

If you’re a player looking for a classic feel with modern technology, then look no further than the Graphene 360+ Prestige.

This racket offers a smaller head size than many are used to at just 93sq in, meaning you can get ultimate precision and control.

Whilst not all players will be able to wield this stick effectively, if you have the skill to find the sweet spot consistently you’ll revel in the Prestige’s plush dampened feel.

 

Yonex VCORE Pro 97 330

The racket of Stan the Man Wawrinka, this hefty stick is ideal for a powerful ball striker that likes to take big cuts at the ball.

With fantastic stability and strong aerodynamics, this racket allows you to produce unparalleled racket head speed.

The open string pattern also helps spin generation, making this an excellent all round racker for a strong and athletic player that can handle its weight.

 

Tecnifibre ATP Tfight 320 XTC 

This sturdy racket from Tecnifibre really packs a punch and is a good choice for a player looking to maximise their power.

The slightly more flexible construction gives this racket a more forgiving and plush feel on contact.

You also get a great feel from this stick, making it a good all rounder for the advanced player!