Choosing a new tennis racket can be a difficult process, but it’s particularly challenging for beginner players.

When it comes to choosing the best tennis racket for a beginner player, we’re here to tell you there is no “best” option, but there are lots of ways to help find the best fit for you. 

So, a little like our best tennis rackets for intermediate players article, we’re not going to claim there’s one racket out there that’s better than all the rest, but we’re going to talk you through some things to consider, and then a number of our favorite rackets in each category.

 

What Should You be Looking for?

 

As a beginner, you’re taking your first steps in tennis and building the basic technique that’s going to help you progress your game.

The key ingredient here is that the racket’s easy to play with. 

If you’re trying to play with a heavy racket then it makes it so much harder to learn the correct techniques, and you’re not going to see many benefits.

Instead, you want a racket that focuses on maneuverability and comfort whilst also giving you the performance you need. 

One thing to remember here is that the racket you end up with is probably going to be quite different from what the pros are using on TV.

While it might be tempting to think “oh if it works for Federer then it has to work for me,” it’s not going to be the case, and instead, you need to find the racket that fits you at this moment in time. 

Hopefully, your tennis will progress quickly and you will soon be classing yourself as an intermediate tennis player, but if you make the right decision on your beginner racket, then it should last you even as you continue to improve your strokes. 

 

Weight 

 

The weight of your racket is one of the most important ingredients. If your racket is too heavy or too light, then it won’t just affect your performance, but it can also lead to injuries that keep you off the court. 

In general, slightly lighter rackets will suit beginner players better as they’re easier to swing, and can help you get power and spin from more limited strokes.

However, this is also going to depend on your level of strength, and ideally you want to find a racket that feels comfortable in your hands, and you can swing comfortably. 

Racket companies sometimes towt the super light weight of their rackets, but lighter isn’t always better.

You can swing faster, but the lack of the weight in the frame will restrict you from improving your power levels, so they’re not necessarily great rackets to move your game forward with. 

Instead, you want to find a balance that suits you. For the majority of people, we would suggest this is somewhere between 270-300g unstrung. 

Head Size 

 

Head size might not be quite as important as weight, but it’s another option you’ve got. 

Tennis rackets come in lots of different shapes and sizes, and you can get some with small heads (97 sq inch and lower) and others with very large heads (up to around 112 sq inch).

Just like with weight though, there is a tradeoff, and there’s not necessarily one size that’s best. 

With a small head, you tend to get good control and feel, but the obvious difficulty is that you’ve got a much smaller area to aim for.

A very large head on the other hand is going to have a big sweet spot, and offer easy power, and spin, but the control can be lacking. 

When it comes to beginner rackets, we find the best option is something in the middle.

The idea of a 112 sq inch head might be nice, but for the most part it’s not necessary.

With a 98-104 sq inch racket you’re going to have plenty of string to hit the ball with, and you will get a good balance of power, spin, and control.

Once again, it’s going to boil down to what you feel comfortable with, but you want something that gives you a good balance, and is going to be able give you the performance you need as you continue to improve. 

 

Power vs Control 

 

This is something we talk about a lot because it’s not as straightforward as it might seem. 

When you’re a beginner, you want a racket that’s going to give you a little power boost from your swings, but the more you develop your game, the more you are going to take responsibility for generating power (instead of the racket).

As this happens, you will start to rely more and more on the control of the racket to help you tame the power you’re generating. 

This is one of the reasons why we don’t recommend beginner players going simply for the most “powerful” racket.

You want to develop your game so your strokes are creating the power, which means working on fast, full swings.

If you’ve got a rocket launcher in your hands, then it’s much more difficult to continue to maximize your swings without hitting the back fence. 

 

TheTennisBros.com’s Best Beginner Rackets

 

So, we’ve already mentioned we don’t really believe in “best” rackets, but we do have a few favorites which we find work well for players looking for certain characteristics. 

Because we think all beginner tennis rackets should have a strong focus on maneuverability, we’ve included that as a given, but we’ve broken things down further so we have rackets for people looking for power, spin, or an all round playing style. 

 

Beginner Rackets for Power

 

As we’ve mentioned, control vs power is quite complicated. However, these rackets can help you get “easy power” and an extra boost from your strokes as they are now. 

 

Wilson Clash 100UL

 

Wilson brought out the Clash rackets to great acclaim as they represented a step forward in racket technology. 

These sticks are designed to offer amazing comfort, but without compromising on performance, and that’s exactly what you get.

This racket ticks all our boxes for a beginner tennis racket because it’s incredibly easy and comfortable to play with, but it’s also got the kind of performance that allows you to grow your game. 

It gives you a nice injection of power, and yet for its weight, it doesn’t compromise on control.

At 265g unstrung, the weight is extremely manageable, so if you feel like you can manage something a little bit heavier, then it’s well worth looking at the Clash 100L which is 280g unstrung. 

 

Head Graphene 360+ Extreme S

 

The Extreme series is one of our favourites when it comes to easy power and spin.

The Extreme S is 275g unstrung, but again, a very maneuverable racket which makes it a great pick for beginners. 

This option is one of the easiest swinging rackets out there, which will help you generate good power and easy access to spin.

Just like the Clash though, it’s a racket that can grow with you, and will last you well into your intermediate tennis. 

If you’re looking to get more free power and easy spin, then the Head Graphene 360+ Extreme S is a good option. 

 

Beginner Rackets for Spin

 

At the end of the day, spin comes from your strokes, but there are rackets that can help you get that little bit more spin out of your shots.

All of these rackets are nice and easy to play with, but they’ve got that extra emphasis on spin that can be helpful for beginner players. 

 

Babolat Pure Aero L

 

The Pure Aero range is repped by legendary left-hander Rafael Nadal, and a bit like the great Spaniard, it’s known for its spin. 

This is a racket that offers plenty of power and spin, but it does so without losing focus on the basics.

You’ve got enough control to tame the spin it helps you create and like the other rackets on this list it’s super maneuverable. 

If you’re looking for speed and spin, then you’re in the right place with the Babolat Pure Aero L. 

Yonex Ezone 100L

 

Yonex produces some brilliant rackets, and the Ezone is certainly one of them.

At 285g unstrung, it’s slightly on the heavier side for beginner players, but it’s a very maneuverable racket and certainly one strong adults will be able to play with. 

Like the Pure Aero, it has a great combination of power and spin, but isn’t so power-oriented that you don’t get the control you need.

This means it’s a racket you can grow with whilst benefiting in the short term from the easy spin potential. 

This stick is wonderfully easy to play with and featured as one of our best rackets under 300g.

 

All-Round Beginner Rackets

 

If you’re looking for a racket that gives you a perfect middle ground, then look no further than these great beginner rackets. 

 

Babolat Pure Strike Team 

 

So, maybe I’m a bit biased because I use a version of the Pure Strike, but it really is a great middle ground.

The Pure Strike Team offers great maneuverability, excellent control and reasonable spin and power. 

If you’re looking for a racket that’s going to encourage you to develop every area of your game, then this is one of our favorite options.

It’s well balanced, and this gives you great all round potential. 

 

Wilson Pro Staff UL

 

If we were to pick a racket based on looks, then we would probably go for a Pro Staff.

Of course, this isn’t how we choose our rackets, but the Wilson Pro Staff UL makes the list nonetheless. 

This racket offers brilliant control for its weight and this allows you to really push your strokes as far as they go.

Developing good racket head speed is one of the most important parts of your development and this stick is going to help you achieve this. 

Again, this is another racket that has the potential to grow with you, but there’s also the option of the slightly heavier Wilson Pro Staff L

 

Takeaways

 

There are lots of great beginner tennis rackets out there, but it’s important you find the one that suits you.

The weight is the key aspect that you want to get right, so it’s always a good idea to try and demo a racket if you can.

This way you get to see how it feels on your swings and make sure it’s a good fit. 

Performance-wise, we always find it’s quite easy to get carried away with promises of huge power and spin from racket companies.

However, if you’re going to improve your game in all areas, then it’s just as beneficial to have a solid, all-round racket that ticks a lot of boxes.

Power and spin aren’t everything, and ultimately, you want to develop your strokes so you generate these characteristics yourself. 

To do this, you need to have some control from your racket, and this is one of the reasons we believe that more often than not a “middle ground” is the best option. 

We’ve picked out some of our favorite “middle ground” beginner rackets and shown you the strengths, now it’s up to you to pick out your best beginner tennis racket. 

 

Article by: Will